Ge’ez/Tigrinya translation of Sumerian God(s)

The contextual and symbolic etymology refers to Ninharsag as the goddess of childbirth and of mothers as she is also the fertility goddess. ‘Nin hars sega’, ‘Goddess, let me have a child’ tells us that the women used to beg the goddess for their child to be healthy and alive, as child immortality rate was very high in antediluvian times. ‘Damgualna’ could refer to the people associating themselves with her bloodline as Enki and Damkina/Ninhursag, a creation myth wherein the two deities were the one’s responsible for the creation of humanity. Her Assyrian name ‘Damkina’ also reaffirms that she was indeed the mother of humanity, which is were we get the name Mummu which stayed to this day with us as we still call our mothers, Mamma.

| Ge’ez-Tigrinya | The language of our collective consciousness |

So ancient is this language that it provides a template to interpret the contextual and symbolic meaning of words, phrases and full sentences of almost all archaic languages, from Sanskrit and Hebrew to Greek and Assyrian. It can even be applied to the vernacular we hear and write every day as part of the evolution of the collective consciousness. below are some sample translations from the hundreds found within the book.

A-tra-hasis | Tablet 1 – Part 2 |

what is fascinating is, I am not a specialist on languages, but I am confident anyone who speaks Tigrigna could have a look at any Sumerian tablet and make out most of the words. it is that obvious and simple. I encourage any Tigrigna speaker to have a look at the Sumerian tablets translations by Wilfred G. Lambert and Alan R. Millard on their ground breaking book, “The Babylonian story of the flood”

How did they miss it ??? Sumerian is Geez/Tigrigna

I have come to the conclusion that the Sumerian language is the same as Geez/Tigrigna.
what is fascinating is, I am not a specialist on languages, but I am confident anyone who speaks Tigrigna could have a look at any Sumerian tablet and make out most of the words. it is that obvious and simple. I encourage any Tigrigna speaker to have a look at the Sumerian tablets translations by Wilfred G. Lambert and Alan R. Millard on their ground breaking book, “The Babylonian story of the flood”