Ge’ez/Tigrinya translation of the Sumerian King List – Part 3


One thing you have to ask yourself is how does Ge’ez/Tigrinya translation give an accurate historical and contextual etymology which makes much more sense than the manistream translations. I will leave you to your own judgement.

Zuqaqip – ዙቃቂብ

Zaqqa – ዘቀ – sink to the bottom, go down.

Zekku – ዘኩ – the person concerned, that.

Qebew – ቀበው – afflicted with dropsy.

Qeb’ – ቅበአ – annoint, smear, grease, plaster.

Ziq – ዚቅ – antiphonal chants.

Zeq – ዝቅ – leather bag.

Zaqaqebe – The anointed went down.

Zekku Qebew – The person concerned was afflicted with Dropsy.

The contextual and symbolic meaning tells us that the anointed one went down, his regin came to an end. It could also mean that the king in question was suffering from dropsy (a disease). you have to remember these ancient stories were written by scribes based on oral tradition thousands of years later.

mainstream understanding

Zuqaqip of Kish was the ninth Sumerian king of the semi-legendary First Dynasty of Kish, according to the Sumerian King List, where his length of reign is given as 900 years. His name means “Scorpion”. Zuqaqip is unlikely to have existed as his name does not appear on texts dating from the period in which he was presumed to have lived (Early Dynastic period).

Atab – አታብ

Ataba – አተበ – seal, mark with a seal,

Utabe – ኡታቤ – marking with a seal.

Ab – አብ – Father.

Ata – አተ – enter.

Tab’a – ተባዕ – courageous, brave.

Atab’ – እተባዕ – The brave one.

Atab – አተብ – He marked with a seal.

EteAb – አተ አብ – The Father enetered.

The contextual and symbolic translation tell us that the King was a brave and courageous King. It could also tell us that he could be the first King to use a seal.

mainstream translation

Atab of Kish was the tenth Sumerian king in the First Dynasty of Kish (after c. 2900 BC), according to the Sumerian king list. His successor was his son Mashda. Atab is unlikely to have existed as his name does not appear on texts dating from the period in which he was presumed to have lived (Early Dynastic period).

Mashda – መሰደ/መሸደ

Mes’ – መጸ – come.

Hada – ሀደ – one.

Mes’ – መሰ – night time, after dark.

Heda – ሄደ – snatch, take away by force, rob.

heydi – ሀያዲ – violent person.

Mes’hada – መጸ ሀደ – The One, came.

Mes’haydi – መጸ ሀያዲ – The violent one came.

Mes’heda – መጸ ሄደ – He came and took by force.

The contextual and symbolic meaning tells us that he was the chose one, probably by his father, Atab. The second translation could tell us that he was a violent king. The last translation tells us that he could be a King that plundered the neighboring cities.

mainstream translation

Mashda of Kish was the eleventh Sumerian king in the First Dynasty of Kish, according to the Sumerian king list. He was a son of the king Atab. Like the other members of the First dynasty prior to Etana, he was named for an animal; his name “Mashda” is Akkadian for “gazelle”. Mashda is unlikely to have existed as his name does not appear on texts dating from the period in which he was presumed to have lived (Early Dynastic period).

Arwium – አረዊም

Hara – ሐራ – army, host, troops, soldiers.

Hora – ሖራ – go, go forth, proceed, depart.

Arwe – አርዌ – wild animal, beast.

Yom – ዮም – day.

Arwaya – አረወየ – become brutal, wild, savage.

Arwayom – አረወዮም – He brutalized them.

Arweyom – አርዌ ኢዮም – They are wild animals.

Arweyom – አርዌዮም – The Day of beast.

The contextual and symbolic translation tells us that he was brutal King. It also translates to ‘they are wild animal’. It could tell us that the Kings during those times were Demi-Gods. The last translation tells that it translates into the ‘day of the beast’ or ‘day of the wild animal’ to celbrated symbolically in honor of the Kingand his totem animal.

Arwium of Kish was the twelfth Sumerian king in the First Dynasty of Kish, according to the Sumerian king list. His father was Mashda, the previous ruler. Like the other members of the First dynasty prior to Etana, he was named for an animal; his name “Arwium” is Akkadian for “male gazelle”. Arwium is unlikely to have existed as his name does not appear on texts dating from the period in which he was presumed to have lived (Early Dynastic period).

Etana – ኢታና

Na – ናዐ – Come.

Atana’ – አተናአ – we entered it.

Ete -እተ – Get in.

Tanna – ተነ – evaporate, smoke, dust, vapor.

Etana – እተነ – he turned into smoke.

Et’Na -ንተ ናዐ – Come, Get in.

Atana’ – አተናአ – we eneter it.

The contextual and symbolic translation ‘We entered it’ meaning Etana and the bird ascended and went into another world and they entered a different world. It could also mean that the people called him, ‘the one who turened into smoke’ as he ascended and disappeared. The last translation could tell us about how he was greeted when he arrived, he was told, ‘come, get in’ which is symbolical of the his name based on the scribe who wrote the cuneiform.

mainstream translation

Etana (Cuneiform:𒂊𒋫𒈾, E.TA.NA) was the probably fictional thirteenth king of the first dynasty of Kish. He is listed in the Sumerian King List as the successor of Arwium, the son of Mashda, as king of Kish. The list also calls Etana “the shepherd, who ascended to heaven and consolidated all the foreign countries”, and states that he ruled 1,560 years (some copies read 635) before being succeeded by his son Balih, said to have ruled 400 years. The kings on the early part of the SKL are usually not considered historical, except when they are mentioned in contemporary Early Dynastic documents. Etana is not one of them.

Babylonian legend says that Etana was desperate to have a child, until one day he helped save an eagle from starving, who then took him up into the sky to find the plant of birth. This led to the birth of his son, Balih.

In the detailed form of the legend, there is a tree with the eagle’s nest at the top, and a serpent at the base. Both the serpent and eagle have promised Utu (the sun god) to behave well toward one another, and they share food with their children.

Balih – በሊሕ

Balih – በሊሕ – sharp, clever.

Balah’ – ባላሒ – rescuer, saver, liberator.

The contextual and symbolic translation is accurate and precise. As Etana’s son blessed by Utu and the God’s, He was a great wise King. It culd also tell us that he was a liberator of the people.

mainstream translation

Balih of Kish was the fourteenth Sumerian king in the First Dynasty of Kish, according to the Sumerian king list. His father was Etana, whom he succeeded as ruler. The kings on the early part of the SKL are usually not considered historical, except when they are mentioned in Early Dynastic documents. Balih is not one of them.

En-me-nuna – እንመኑና

Nuna – ንዑና – come to us.

enme – And it is, And he is, And she is.

Neana – ናዐና – for us (the God’s or the people)

Aname – አነመ – weave.

Ename nuna – እነም ናዐና – He weaved for us.

Enme Nuna – እንመ ናዐና – And he is for us.

The contextual and symbolic translation tell us it was a time when weaving has begun. It could also mean that ‘He is for us’, meaning the king which could have been his epithet.

mainstream translation

En-me-nuna of Kish was the fifteenth Sumerian king in the First Dynasty of Kish, according to the Sumerian King List. The kings on the early part of the SKL are usually not considered historical, except when they are mentioned in Early Dynastic documents. En-me-nuna is not one of them.

Melem-Kish – መለም ኪስ\ሽ

Mal’a – መለአ – fill up, complete, overflow.

Kis – ኪስ – purse.

Mal’am’ kis – መላእማ ኪስ – And his pockets was filled up.

Mal’am’ kish – መላእማ ኪሽ – He completed Kish.

The contextual and symbolic meaning tells us that He is developed the city of Kish. It could also mean that he was a corrupt leader who filled up his pockets. It all depends on what the scribe was trying to tell us.

mainstream translation.

Melem-Kish of Kish was the sixteenth Sumerian king in the First Dynasty of Kish, according to the Sumerian King List. His father was En-me-nuna, whom he succeeded as ruler. The kings on the early part of the SKL are usually not considered historical, except when they are mentioned in Early Dynastic documents. Melem-Kish is not one of them.

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